LogoTow2Guides_01

LogoTow2Guides_02

LogoTow2Guides_03

LogoTow2Guides_04

LogoTow2Guides_05

LogoTow2Guides_06

LogoTow2Guides_07

LogoTow2Guides_08

LogoTow2Guides_09

t-spacer

Home
Resources
Books
Coat of Arms
Medals WW1
Medieval Families
Memories of War
Postcodes
References
Sailing Ships
Service Deaths

t-spacer

t-spacer

t-spacer

t-spacer

t-spacer

0901_GreenHosting100

t-spacer

t-spacer

t-spacer

t-spacer

t-spacer

LogoTow2Guides_01

LogoTow2Guides_03

LogoTow2Guides_07

Memories of War

I have never had to join up and fight - being too young for World War II and the conscripted national service that followed. More interested in free enterprise than military discipline I was only too glad to live in a time and place that was relatively safe and peaceful. Anyone born in Britain during the second half of the 20th century has largely avoided the conflicts that took such a toll in early decades - despite the recent losses in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Looking back from the comfort and safety of the 21st century it is clear that most of Britain’s people today have had a much easier time than many of the earlier generations. Even though Britain is only a shadow of the world power it was in 1900 - and the powers of the state keep eroding our freedom - life is still relatively trouble-free.

If you take the time to research your family or town you mat be shocked to learn just how much was sacrificed by ancestors and townsfolk in the relatively recent past. And much of this sacrifice came through the two Great Wars. Shocking events that changed both the fate of nations and lives of so many ordinary people. Millions died. Millions more had their lives changed dramatically. Britain overcame its enemies but was bankrupted in the process. The Empire was lost.

These are just a few fragmented notes - like drops in an ocean - that add just a little to our collective Memories of War.

 

Military Service - Medals and Mementoes

With the recent death of the last veteran of the First World War trenches there has been a burst of media activity. This may give a temporary boost to awareness. But for most families there has been no reason to search out - or even keep - whatever remains from a long-dead relative’s war time service.

Certainly my father’s medals sat in the cardboard box they arrived in for all of 40 years. But then they were stolen in a house burglary (sorry but no spirit of forgiveness for the heartless petty thief). It was then all too apparent that they were irreplaceable. The fact that my father was not alive to suffer the loss was small consolation. [The box was addressed to - W. Townsley, 5 York Place, Shipley, West Yorks - reward for return]

It was almost a year later that I had a change of heart and decided to look for replacements. Or rather substitutes for the real thing - since finding the originals would be the only way to restore the situation. Since the police gave me little hope of finding anything it was time to start the search. I was soon surprised to find just how many war medals were being offered for sale. Some were simply copies but many were originals - and some even came with their own fragments of history.

Over a period of a few weeks I collected a significant list of names and service numbers and published the results of TownsleyFamily.org.uk. Considering how many died and how few were searching the chances of a match were close to zero. However I did have a small number of “hits” where the information was of use. The info collected is still available and I may get time to reload it, and even update it, here.

 

LogoTow2Guides_01

LogoTow2Guides_03

LogoTow2Guides_01

LogoTow2Guides_03

Linkaw1

LinkB1w

LogoTow2Guides_07

LogoTow2Guides_09

Brotherton.org.uk SheekyFamily.org.uk StrangewayFamily.org.uk YorkshireHeritage.org.uk

Copyright Free © 2017. All content produced by amateur enthusiasts on an as is basis.